Arthritis; and what you can do to help

Arthritis; and what you can do to help

Author -  Good Health

When someone you love is suffering from a chronic condition such as arthritis, you may have seen the associated challenges, but do you ever consider if there is more you can do to help? To support someone with arthritis, it is important to understand not just how it effects their day-to-day life; but to be educated on the condition itself. Although there is no cure for arthritis, there are many ways to help manage the condition.

Does someone you know have sore joints?

Arthritis is an inflammatory condition where there is cartilage degeneration. Cartilage provides protection to the bones, acting like a shock absorber during increased motion. Degeneration causes the bones to rub together and such a sensation has been compared to the grinding of shattered glass between joints, causing considerate pain. More than half a million New Zealanders will be affected by arthritis in their lifetime. Genetic and environmental factors contribute to the manifestation of arthritis, and so it is important that you consider how your everyday choices can affect your health, and influence those around you.

dreamstime_xl_15987802.jpg

Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis, develops due to the wear-and-tear process and is generally seen once a person is over 40. The ability to manufacture and restore cartilage decreases with aging and after long term exceptional stress; causing localised damage in weight bearing joints. Degenerative changes increase stress on the collagen matrix of the cartilage resulting in the release of enzymes that further destroy the cartilage, wearing out the joint. The onset is joint stiffness, however as osteoarthritis progresses, tenderness, swelling, joint cracking and chronic pain develop.

Rheumatoid arthritis

Rheumatoid-arthritis is an autoimmune condition that can develop at any age and affects the entire body. Cartilage erosion is due to an autoimmune reaction where antibodies formed by the immune system attack the joint tissue. Onset is typically gradual, beginning with a manifestation of inflammation, fever, fatigue and generalised stiffness. The joints eventually become painful, tender and morning stiffness soon lasts longer than an hour. A systematic disease, rheumatoid arthritis typically effect joints bilaterally (i.e. both hands, both ankles) however it develops to affect the heart, lungs and skin, and sufferers often experience depression, sleep issues and low self-esteem.

ING_42097_01465.jpg

Obesity, diabetes and heart disease

Obesity is the number-one preventable risk factor for osteoarthritis. Obesity can raise the risk of developing osteoarthritis and will intensify the symptoms of all arthritic conditions. Weight increases the pressure placed on joints, which increases stress and cartilage degeneration. Obesity not only increases the risk of osteoarthritis but type 2 diabetes; which is another risk factor for developing osteoarthritis. Type 1 diabetics are at risk of developing rheumatoid-arthritis, as both conditions are autoimmune diseases and may be influenced by genetic factors. In addition, fat cells create and release chemicals which further promote inflammation. Increased inflammation puts arthritis sufferers at risk of developing heart disease, as it can reshape blood vessel walls, increases blood pressure and decreasing blood flow to the heart.

Dietary considerations

As arthritis is an inflammatory disease, the most important thing is to increase the alkalinity of the body and avoid food that increases inflammation. Reducing acidic and inflammatory foods such as dairy, gluten, processed sugar and coffee can decrease symptoms. Decrease red meat consumption and alter the intake of dietary fats and oils; including more salmon and swapping highly inflammatory vegetable oils for the anti-inflammatory olive and avocado oils. If you are suffering from rheumatoid arthritis, follow an elimination diet and slowly reintroduce foods to detect allergies. Increasing anthocyanidin rich foods (blueberries, cherries, strawberries) will strengthen and prevent the destruction of collagen in the connective tissue, and decrease joint oxidation.

Tip: During periods of increased inflammation; try making fresh pineapple juice, with fresh ginger or turmeric root to decrease inflammation and relieve symptoms.

ING_33594_84291.jpg

Pain and Inflammation

It is the sensation of pain that often motivates people to seek help. Pain can be described as either acute (less than three months) or as per arthritis, chronic (lasting longer than three months). Pain, although unpleasant, encourages people to make necessary adjustments to enhance healing and avoid further damage. A main component of our immune system, acute inflammation is a rapid, nonspecific response to injury whereas chronic inflammation lasts longer than two weeks and is often a sign of an incomplete healing process. By managing pain and inflammation, you can help manage arthritis. Although pain is not always curable, there are measures available to help provide relief.

Top three arthritis supplements

1. Joint Active. Joint Active has been specifically formulated to support the regeneration and maintenance of cartilage. UC-II stops cells from attacking collagen, reducing the inflammatory response and working with the immune system to increase joint support; making it an effective supplement for arthritic conditions.

2. Turmeric Extra. The active ingredient in turmeric, Curcumin, is a strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory. Curcumin works on several inflammatory pathways and is extremely beneficial for decreasing symptoms of arthritis, specifically improving morning stiffness and decreasing swelling.

3. Opti-CoQ10. Opti-CoQ10, contains a powerful antioxidant which helps to support the body’s overall wellbeing and vitality. CoQ10 provides cardiovascular support, increases energy metabolism and supports the nervous system; beneficial especially for suffers of rheumatoid arthritis.

dreamstime_xl_9349621.jpg

The importance of keeping active

The pain associated with arthritis is increased significantly during prolonged activity, and is relieved by rest. However due to the risk factors associated with decreased physical activity, it is important to exercise and maintain a healthy weight when able to. Finding a balance is key, and once a flare up is under control, low impact exercises such as walking, swimming and tai chi, increase blood flow, support the joints and increase mental wellbeing.

Testimonial from Lisa

Just wanted to let you know that by day 4 of taking Joint Active I have a massive improvement in my fingers. I knew that they had become very stiff – to the point of affecting my hand writing. Now they feel normal like they used to. Can even click my fingers which I haven’t been able to do for a long time. Haven’t noticed a huge improvement in the advanced osteo in the big toe joints as yet but no longer have twinges in the left knee. Have been using the magnesium cream every day on toe joints and use like a hand cream for my hands every evening. Is it OK to use it like that? Absolutely thrilled with the improvements so far, will keep you up to date with further progress.

Kind Regards & Thanks,
Lisa.

ING_13573_02887.jpg

Having arthritis can be challenging, but it doesn’t have to mean that you sacrifice the things you love. Many people diagnosed with arthritis find it encouraging to talk to someone who has lived with the condition for some time. Arthritis New Zealand can organise this and provide additional phone based support to any questions you may have. Email or call on NewlyDiagnosed@arthritis.org.nz 0800 663 463. If you have arthritis or know someone that does, use this article as a point of discussion, and create a better understanding between you and your loved ones.

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Arthritis; and what you can do to help

When someone you love is suffering from a chronic condition such as arthritis, you may have seen the associated challenges, but do you ever consider if there is more you can do to help? To support someone with arthritis, it is important to understand not just how it effects their day-to-day life; but to be educated on the condition itself. Although there is no cure for arthritis, there are many ways to help manage the condition.

Does someone you know have sore joints?

Arthritis is an inflammatory condition where there is cartilage degeneration. Cartilage provides protection to the bones, acting like a shock absorber during increased motion. Degeneration causes the bones to rub together and such a sensation has been compared to the grinding of shattered glass between joints, causing considerate pain. More than half a million New Zealanders will be affected by arthritis in their lifetime. Genetic and environmental factors contribute to the manifestation of arthritis, and so it is important that you consider how your everyday choices can affect your health, and influence those around you.

dreamstime_xl_15987802.jpg

Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis, develops due to the wear-and-tear process and is generally seen once a person is over 40. The ability to manufacture and restore cartilage decreases with aging and after long term exceptional stress; causing localised damage in weight bearing joints. Degenerative changes increase stress on the collagen matrix of the cartilage resulting in the release of enzymes that further destroy the cartilage, wearing out the joint. The onset is joint stiffness, however as osteoarthritis progresses, tenderness, swelling, joint cracking and chronic pain develop.

Rheumatoid arthritis

Rheumatoid-arthritis is an autoimmune condition that can develop at any age and affects the entire body. Cartilage erosion is due to an autoimmune reaction where antibodies formed by the immune system attack the joint tissue. Onset is typically gradual, beginning with a manifestation of inflammation, fever, fatigue and generalised stiffness. The joints eventually become painful, tender and morning stiffness soon lasts longer than an hour. A systematic disease, rheumatoid arthritis typically effect joints bilaterally (i.e. both hands, both ankles) however it develops to affect the heart, lungs and skin, and sufferers often experience depression, sleep issues and low self-esteem.

ING_42097_01465.jpg

Obesity, diabetes and heart disease

Obesity is the number-one preventable risk factor for osteoarthritis. Obesity can raise the risk of developing osteoarthritis and will intensify the symptoms of all arthritic conditions. Weight increases the pressure placed on joints, which increases stress and cartilage degeneration. Obesity not only increases the risk of osteoarthritis but type 2 diabetes; which is another risk factor for developing osteoarthritis. Type 1 diabetics are at risk of developing rheumatoid-arthritis, as both conditions are autoimmune diseases and may be influenced by genetic factors. In addition, fat cells create and release chemicals which further promote inflammation. Increased inflammation puts arthritis sufferers at risk of developing heart disease, as it can reshape blood vessel walls, increases blood pressure and decreasing blood flow to the heart.

Dietary considerations

As arthritis is an inflammatory disease, the most important thing is to increase the alkalinity of the body and avoid food that increases inflammation. Reducing acidic and inflammatory foods such as dairy, gluten, processed sugar and coffee can decrease symptoms. Decrease red meat consumption and alter the intake of dietary fats and oils; including more salmon and swapping highly inflammatory vegetable oils for the anti-inflammatory olive and avocado oils. If you are suffering from rheumatoid arthritis, follow an elimination diet and slowly reintroduce foods to detect allergies. Increasing anthocyanidin rich foods (blueberries, cherries, strawberries) will strengthen and prevent the destruction of collagen in the connective tissue, and decrease joint oxidation.

Tip: During periods of increased inflammation; try making fresh pineapple juice, with fresh ginger or turmeric root to decrease inflammation and relieve symptoms.

ING_33594_84291.jpg

Pain and Inflammation

It is the sensation of pain that often motivates people to seek help. Pain can be described as either acute (less than three months) or as per arthritis, chronic (lasting longer than three months). Pain, although unpleasant, encourages people to make necessary adjustments to enhance healing and avoid further damage. A main component of our immune system, acute inflammation is a rapid, nonspecific response to injury whereas chronic inflammation lasts longer than two weeks and is often a sign of an incomplete healing process. By managing pain and inflammation, you can help manage arthritis. Although pain is not always curable, there are measures available to help provide relief.

Top three arthritis supplements

1. Joint Active. Joint Active has been specifically formulated to support the regeneration and maintenance of cartilage. UC-II stops cells from attacking collagen, reducing the inflammatory response and working with the immune system to increase joint support; making it an effective supplement for arthritic conditions.

2. Turmeric Extra. The active ingredient in turmeric, Curcumin, is a strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory. Curcumin works on several inflammatory pathways and is extremely beneficial for decreasing symptoms of arthritis, specifically improving morning stiffness and decreasing swelling.

3. Opti-CoQ10. Opti-CoQ10, contains a powerful antioxidant which helps to support the body’s overall wellbeing and vitality. CoQ10 provides cardiovascular support, increases energy metabolism and supports the nervous system; beneficial especially for suffers of rheumatoid arthritis.

dreamstime_xl_9349621.jpg

The importance of keeping active

The pain associated with arthritis is increased significantly during prolonged activity, and is relieved by rest. However due to the risk factors associated with decreased physical activity, it is important to exercise and maintain a healthy weight when able to. Finding a balance is key, and once a flare up is under control, low impact exercises such as walking, swimming and tai chi, increase blood flow, support the joints and increase mental wellbeing.

Testimonial from Lisa

Just wanted to let you know that by day 4 of taking Joint Active I have a massive improvement in my fingers. I knew that they had become very stiff – to the point of affecting my hand writing. Now they feel normal like they used to. Can even click my fingers which I haven’t been able to do for a long time. Haven’t noticed a huge improvement in the advanced osteo in the big toe joints as yet but no longer have twinges in the left knee. Have been using the magnesium cream every day on toe joints and use like a hand cream for my hands every evening. Is it OK to use it like that? Absolutely thrilled with the improvements so far, will keep you up to date with further progress.

Kind Regards & Thanks,
Lisa.

ING_13573_02887.jpg

Having arthritis can be challenging, but it doesn’t have to mean that you sacrifice the things you love. Many people diagnosed with arthritis find it encouraging to talk to someone who has lived with the condition for some time. Arthritis New Zealand can organise this and provide additional phone based support to any questions you may have. Email or call on NewlyDiagnosed@arthritis.org.nz 0800 663 463. If you have arthritis or know someone that does, use this article as a point of discussion, and create a better understanding between you and your loved ones.

Arthritis; and what you can do to help
 
 
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