Beating Fatigue

Beating Fatigue

Author -  Good Health

If caffeine is the only thing getting you out of bed in the morning, it might be time to ask yourself if you are stressed. The stressors we face in our everyday lives may be different to that of past generations, however they still bring about the same physiological response that we would have if we were running away from an animal. Stress initiates a coping response that has us reaching for caffeine, sugar or refined grains to provide a quick energy fix and push us through the day. It affects eating habits, time management and often leads to an impaired sleep leaving us waking up still feeling tired. From time-to-time it is important to observe stress, and perceive how it affects your health, wellness and everyday relationships. Do you need that extra cup of coffee, or do you simply need a moment to yourself?

02B61112.jpg

The (Stressful) Modern Lifestyle

The nature of modern life attracts stress. Whether it is an increased work demand, traffic during the commute, or financial strain, we are exposed to many more stressors than our ancestors. Stress initiates a coping response so that we may continue with our day-to-day lives because now more than ever there is an expectation to be available 24-7. Living in a constant state of stress reduces the adrenal glands ability to work effectively which can be detrimental to both your short-term and long-term health. A slightly stressful situation may initially offer an extra energy-boost however if the stress does not subside, it can quickly lead to adrenal fatigue.

02G54552.jpg

Stress Adaption Scale

During times of stress, a series of chemical reactions and physical responses take place. Our adrenal glands regulate many of these processes, and also influence energy production, immune function and blood sugar levels. People vary greatly in their ability to cope and respond to stress however no matter the source, once stress occurs, three successive phases follow, as our adrenal glands respond to change.

Alarm phase: Stress stimulates the fight-or-response, diverting nutrient rich blood and oxygen towards larger muscles in the heart and legs, in preparation to run as we would have historically from danger. The same nutrient rich blood is diverted away from our digestive and reproductive systems and hormones such as adrenalin and cortisol are released from our adrenal glands. After the initial stressor passes, your body goes through a temporary recovery phase where you may feel more tired and have a desire to rest.

Resistance or Adaption phase: Also known as chronic stress, the modern lifestyle sees many of us living in this phase where we either resist the stress (sometimes for years) or learn to adapt to it – the stressor becoming the new normal. Resistance keeps your body fighting stress long after the fight-or-flight response has occurred, as cortisol continues to be released. Cortisol is extremely beneficial for numerous processes however if produced long-term, as your body tries to resists stress, the overproduction may lead to adrenal fatigue.

Exhaustion phase: Many people will never experience this stage however if you suffer from chronic exhaustion or feel wired-and-tired, you may be suffering from adrenal fatigue. In the exhaustion phase, a lower level of cortisol is secreted due to exhaustion. This makes it harder to face everyday responsibilities, affecting your ability to deal with issues previously faced with ease.

dreamstime_s_43822196.jpg

10 tips to find your balance

If you are reaching for a coffee first thing in the morning or craving sugar to get you through the afternoon, you may need to consider making some changes before your health is compromised. Here are our top ten tips to help you beat fatigue. 

  1. Swap coffee for tea (green, black or herbal) or a glass of hot water & a slice of lemon. It surprising how many people are suffering from dehydration or have a coffee simply because they need a moment to themselves. If you are not ready to part with coffee, have a cup ideally before 12pm to reduce the effect it may have on sleep.
  2. Eliminate sugar and include fat and protein at every meal to regulate blood sugar levels and make energy last longer.
  3. Swap refined grains for wholegrains to avoid blood sugar spikes. Starting your day with a bowl of whole grain oats will nourish your nervous system, adding cinnamon can help to regulate blood sugar levels.
  4. Increase dark leafy vegetables such as spinach, kale and silver beet for a dense nutrient diet. 
  5. Make sure your bedroom is a place of relaxation. Light a candle, put on some soft music or use calming essential oils such as lavender or chamomile in a diffuser. 
  6. Reduce excess blue light from electronics at least an hour before you go to sleep.
  7. Book yourself a massage. Touch is one of the most ancient healing techniques and can reduce cortisol levels. 
  8. Practise diaphragmatic breathing or mindfulness meditation to reduce blood pressure, heart rate and create an awareness of the here-and-now. This may assist in resilience to stressors. 
  9. Talk to someone or write it all down. Discussing stressors and how you are coping can foster clarity and you may discover new coping-strategies.
  10. Take a moment to reflect on your daily achievements, remember that life is stressful and you are doing great!

02H50133.jpg

Any stressful situation can produce an imbalance within our body and no matter what the source, the body is not designed to cope with long-term stress. Our modern lifestyle is full of stressors and although we may not be able to control the situations in our life, we can control our response to them. Many of us live day-to-day in the resilience phase however this can be detrimental to our health and wellbeing. Put yourself first and make sure you reflect on how you are responding to stress. Addressing stress as it occurs can steer you in the right direction towards maintaining good health, happy relationships and a good night’s sleep that will leave you feeling energised for the day ahead.

For more information on stress hormones and how they may be effecting you, take a look at supporting Adrenal Health during the day and the night.

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Beating Fatigue

If caffeine is the only thing getting you out of bed in the morning, it might be time to ask yourself if you are stressed. The stressors we face in our everyday lives may be different to that of past generations, however they still bring about the same physiological response that we would have if we were running away from an animal. Stress initiates a coping response that has us reaching for caffeine, sugar or refined grains to provide a quick energy fix and push us through the day. It affects eating habits, time management and often leads to an impaired sleep leaving us waking up still feeling tired. From time-to-time it is important to observe stress, and perceive how it affects your health, wellness and everyday relationships. Do you need that extra cup of coffee, or do you simply need a moment to yourself?

02B61112.jpg

The (Stressful) Modern Lifestyle

The nature of modern life attracts stress. Whether it is an increased work demand, traffic during the commute, or financial strain, we are exposed to many more stressors than our ancestors. Stress initiates a coping response so that we may continue with our day-to-day lives because now more than ever there is an expectation to be available 24-7. Living in a constant state of stress reduces the adrenal glands ability to work effectively which can be detrimental to both your short-term and long-term health. A slightly stressful situation may initially offer an extra energy-boost however if the stress does not subside, it can quickly lead to adrenal fatigue.

02G54552.jpg

Stress Adaption Scale

During times of stress, a series of chemical reactions and physical responses take place. Our adrenal glands regulate many of these processes, and also influence energy production, immune function and blood sugar levels. People vary greatly in their ability to cope and respond to stress however no matter the source, once stress occurs, three successive phases follow, as our adrenal glands respond to change.

Alarm phase: Stress stimulates the fight-or-response, diverting nutrient rich blood and oxygen towards larger muscles in the heart and legs, in preparation to run as we would have historically from danger. The same nutrient rich blood is diverted away from our digestive and reproductive systems and hormones such as adrenalin and cortisol are released from our adrenal glands. After the initial stressor passes, your body goes through a temporary recovery phase where you may feel more tired and have a desire to rest.

Resistance or Adaption phase: Also known as chronic stress, the modern lifestyle sees many of us living in this phase where we either resist the stress (sometimes for years) or learn to adapt to it – the stressor becoming the new normal. Resistance keeps your body fighting stress long after the fight-or-flight response has occurred, as cortisol continues to be released. Cortisol is extremely beneficial for numerous processes however if produced long-term, as your body tries to resists stress, the overproduction may lead to adrenal fatigue.

Exhaustion phase: Many people will never experience this stage however if you suffer from chronic exhaustion or feel wired-and-tired, you may be suffering from adrenal fatigue. In the exhaustion phase, a lower level of cortisol is secreted due to exhaustion. This makes it harder to face everyday responsibilities, affecting your ability to deal with issues previously faced with ease.

dreamstime_s_43822196.jpg

10 tips to find your balance

If you are reaching for a coffee first thing in the morning or craving sugar to get you through the afternoon, you may need to consider making some changes before your health is compromised. Here are our top ten tips to help you beat fatigue. 

  1. Swap coffee for tea (green, black or herbal) or a glass of hot water & a slice of lemon. It surprising how many people are suffering from dehydration or have a coffee simply because they need a moment to themselves. If you are not ready to part with coffee, have a cup ideally before 12pm to reduce the effect it may have on sleep.
  2. Eliminate sugar and include fat and protein at every meal to regulate blood sugar levels and make energy last longer.
  3. Swap refined grains for wholegrains to avoid blood sugar spikes. Starting your day with a bowl of whole grain oats will nourish your nervous system, adding cinnamon can help to regulate blood sugar levels.
  4. Increase dark leafy vegetables such as spinach, kale and silver beet for a dense nutrient diet. 
  5. Make sure your bedroom is a place of relaxation. Light a candle, put on some soft music or use calming essential oils such as lavender or chamomile in a diffuser. 
  6. Reduce excess blue light from electronics at least an hour before you go to sleep.
  7. Book yourself a massage. Touch is one of the most ancient healing techniques and can reduce cortisol levels. 
  8. Practise diaphragmatic breathing or mindfulness meditation to reduce blood pressure, heart rate and create an awareness of the here-and-now. This may assist in resilience to stressors. 
  9. Talk to someone or write it all down. Discussing stressors and how you are coping can foster clarity and you may discover new coping-strategies.
  10. Take a moment to reflect on your daily achievements, remember that life is stressful and you are doing great!

02H50133.jpg

Any stressful situation can produce an imbalance within our body and no matter what the source, the body is not designed to cope with long-term stress. Our modern lifestyle is full of stressors and although we may not be able to control the situations in our life, we can control our response to them. Many of us live day-to-day in the resilience phase however this can be detrimental to our health and wellbeing. Put yourself first and make sure you reflect on how you are responding to stress. Addressing stress as it occurs can steer you in the right direction towards maintaining good health, happy relationships and a good night’s sleep that will leave you feeling energised for the day ahead.

For more information on stress hormones and how they may be effecting you, take a look at supporting Adrenal Health during the day and the night.

Beating Fatigue
 
 
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