Growing pains in children

Growing pains in children

Author -  Good Health

In growing children, we can expect, as they reach certain mile stones in life, their triumph doesn’t always come, without the unfortunate trial, of some type of pain.

It can be misunderstood as an inconvenient niggle at night time or a ‘playing up’, but in actual fact, for some children, growing pains are very real.

About twenty five percent to forty percent of children can experience these. They usually strike in early childhood, around three to five years and later again, around eight to twelve years of age.

Active children who jump climb and run suffer from growing pains.jpg

So what are the signs to look out for?

Growing pains tend to concentrate in the muscles, rather than the joints. Children often report pains in their thighs, calves or behind the knees.

They can often come on in the late afternoon or early evening before bed, but the pain can be so intense for some children that it wakes them up from their sleep. They often occur after a child has had a particularly active day of jumping, climbing and running. 

children stretching can soothe growing pains.jpg

Children with growing pains, tend to respond well to massage, stretches and warm compresses, as this improves the circulation and gives some relief. Magnesium supplementation can also help, as this mineral relaxes the muscle tissue and prevents it from over contracting. 

what can parents do to help their children who are suffering from growing pains.jpg

So what else can parents do?

While growing pains are not linked to any serious condition, they can upset kids and sometimes it is difficult for folks to know for sure, if the pain is real or not.

Prevention means giving your child the best nutrition and sleep, to support an active, growing childhood, during their school years. 

Magnesium rich foods that assist children with growing pains.jpg

Foods rich in magnesium include all your leafy greens; salad greens, broccoli, spinach, kale as well as nuts like cashews and almonds. If your child is a fussy eater, there are green powders that can be added to smoothies and soups, to ensure your child is getting a helpful addition to their diet. 

For external use, there are many creams on the market now, containing arnica and magnesium that can be absorbed through the skin, and into the muscle, to help it relax and reduce the pain. 

Happy children dealing with growing pains.jpg

If you are concerned about any other symptoms related to growing pains, it is definitely worth checking this with a health professional, but be reassured, as with most things in life, growing pains will pass, as children grow up.

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Growing pains in children

In growing children, we can expect, as they reach certain mile stones in life, their triumph doesn’t always come, without the unfortunate trial, of some type of pain. It can be misunderstood as an inconvenient niggle at night time or a ‘playing up’, but in actual fact, for some children, growing pains are very real. About twenty five percent to forty percent of children can experience these. They usually strike in early childhood, around three to five years and later again, around eight to twelve years of age.

Active children who jump climb and run suffer from growing pains.jpg

So what are the signs to look out for?

Growing pains tend to concentrate in the muscles, rather than the joints. Children often report pains in their thighs, calves or behind the knees.

They can often come on in the late afternoon or early evening before bed, but the pain can be so intense for some children that it wakes them up from their sleep. They often occur after a child has had a particularly active day of jumping, climbing and running. 

children stretching can soothe growing pains.jpg

Children with growing pains, tend to respond well to massage, stretches and warm compresses, as this improves the circulation and gives some relief. Magnesium supplementation can also help, as this mineral relaxes the muscle tissue and prevents it from over contracting. 

what can parents do to help their children who are suffering from growing pains.jpg

So what else can parents do?

While growing pains are not linked to any serious condition, they can upset kids and sometimes it is difficult for folks to know for sure, if the pain is real or not.

Prevention means giving your child the best nutrition and sleep, to support an active, growing childhood, during their school years. 

Magnesium rich foods that assist children with growing pains.jpg

Foods rich in magnesium include all your leafy greens; salad greens, broccoli, spinach, kale as well as nuts like cashews and almonds. If your child is a fussy eater, there are green powders that can be added to smoothies and soups, to ensure your child is getting a helpful addition to their diet. 

For external use, there are many creams on the market now, containing arnica and magnesium that can be absorbed through the skin, and into the muscle, to help it relax and reduce the pain. 

Happy children dealing with growing pains.jpg

If you are concerned about any other symptoms related to growing pains, it is definitely worth checking this with a health professional, but be reassured, as with most things in life, growing pains will pass, as children grow up.

Growing pains in children

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