Had a gutsful? How to heal your gut.

Had a gutsful? How to heal your gut.

Author -  Good Health

Home to tens-of-millions of micro-organisms the gut is often referred to as the body’s ‘second brain’ as like the brain, the gut impacts virtually every system in the body.

The ecosystem of bacteria that resides inside the gut effects digestion, absorption and the metabolism of nutrients; it also impacts our growth, development, energy levels and immune system.

We need a balance of good and bad bacteria within the gut; however factors such as poor lifestyle choices, diet or an illness can lead to an imbalance of bacteria and a number of health concerns. If you struggle with digestive issues you are far from alone. You may be surprised at the implications poor gut health has on your overall health and wellbeing; the following symptoms may be an indicator that your gut needs some TLC.

10 Signs you may have an unhealthy gut

1.Digestive issues i.e. bloating, flatulence, reflux, diarrhoea or constipation

2.Poor immune health or recurring immune issues

3. Food allergies or sensitivities

4. Anxiety and or depression

5. Chronic fatigue or lack of energy

6. Irritability or mood swings

7. Skin conditions i.e. acne, eczema, rosacea

8. Bad breath - halitosis

9. Poor memory and concentration

10. Trouble maintaining a healthy weight

dreamstime_l_87728748.jpg

The 4 'R's of gut repair

Poor nutrient absorption, a by-product of an imbalance in gut flora, can result in a number of health conditions. The first step to resolving these is to try and remove anything from the diet that may cause direct damage to the gut including; inflammatory foods (refined sugar, flour, fried foods) and irritants (alcohol, caffeine or drugs). Other irritants can include chemicals found in processed foods (artificial colours, sweeteners and preservatives) or skincare. Emotional stress can also have a huge impact on your digestive tract which in turn affects both physical and physiological wellbeing. It is important to take time for rest, relaxation and mindfulness to improve gut health and proper digestion.

dreamstime_l_26733793.jpg

Remove the bad

Poor nutrient absorption, a by-product of an imbalance in gut flora can result in a number of health conditions. The first step to resolving these is to remove anything from the diet that may cause direct damage to the gut and include; inflammatory foods (refined sugar, flour, fried foods) and irritants (alcohol, caffeine or prescription drugs). Other irritants can include chemicals found in processed foods (artificial colours, sweeteners and preservatives). Emotional stress can also have a huge impact on your digestive tract which in turn affects both physical and physiological wellbeing. It is important to take time for rest, relaxation and mindfulness to increase gut health and proper digestion.

Replace the good

Add back into your gut the essential ingredients needed for digestion and absorption of nutrients. Sufficient digestive enzymes, hydrochloric acid (stomach acid) and bile production are all compromised over the years by diet, lifestyle, disease and prescription drugs, but they are needed to maintain optimal gut health. Sufficient stomach acid is also needed for proper digestion. If you suffer from low stomach acid, add lemon or a dash of apple cider vinegar (amount will vary on personal taste) to water and drink first thing in the morning and before meals. Aim to consume fluids in between and not during meals, and add more low-starch vegetables into the diet, naturally enzyme rich and high in fibre.

dreamstime_l_44960203.jpg

Restore (Re-inoculate)

Restoring beneficial bacteria to the gut will re-establish a healthy balance and the overall wellbeing of your digestive system. Gut bacteria are collected and formed at birth creating a home to over 500 different types of bacteria however over time the good-to-bad ratio may become unbalanced. Pre and probiotics can be an effective way of rebalancing the good-to-bad bacteria ratio. The prebiotic feeds the probiotic and other good bacteria increasing their effectiveness and helping to restoring optimal gut flora balance and immune health.

Antibiotics are effective in helping to kill bad bacteria when suffering from an infection however it is important to know that antibiotics kill off the good as well as the bad bacteria. So, if you do need to take antibiotics, taking a pre and probiotic will help to restore the good gut flora and bring the ratio of good-to-bad back into balance again.

dreamstime_l_45025580.jpg

Repair

Once the diet is correct, stressors eliminated, and good bacteria restored, the mucosal lining of the gut needs to be repaired. Providing the correct nutrients necessary to help the repair is absolutely essential. L-glutamine is an amino-acid that helps to rejuvenate the gut lining and is the preferred source of fuel for cells in the small intestine. Slippery elm, Aloe Vera, Milk thistle, Omega-3 Fish Oils and Vitamins A, C and E also help to strengthen and repair the gut wall lining.

Your health and wellbeing depends on the digestion and absorption of key nutrients from the diet and is affected by lifestyle choices. Ensure you are making your gut health a priority and see how it can improve not only you digestive health but your overall health and wellbeing too.

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Had a gutsful? How to heal your gut.

Home to tens-of-millions of micro-organisms the gut is often referred to as the body’s ‘second brain’ as like the brain, the gut impacts virtually every system in the body. The ecosystem of bacteria that resides inside the gut effects digestion, absorption and the metabolism of nutrients; it also impacts our growth, development, energy levels and immune system. We need a balance of good and bad bacteria within the gut; however factors such as poor lifestyle choices, diet or an illness can lead to an imbalance of bacteria and a number of health concerns. If you struggle with digestive issues you are far from alone. You may be surprised at the implications poor gut health has on your overall health and wellbeing; the following symptoms may be an indicator that your gut needs some TLC.

10 Signs you may have an unhealthy gut

1.Digestive issues i.e. bloating, flatulence, reflux, diarrhoea or constipation

2.Poor immune health or recurring immune issues

3. Food allergies or sensitivities

4. Anxiety and or depression

5. Chronic fatigue or lack of energy

6. Irritability or mood swings

7. Skin conditions i.e. acne, eczema, rosacea

8. Bad breath - halitosis

9. Poor memory and concentration

10. Trouble maintaining a healthy weight

dreamstime_l_87728748.jpg

The 4 'R's of gut repair

Poor nutrient absorption, a by-product of an imbalance in gut flora, can result in a number of health conditions. The first step to resolving these is to try and remove anything from the diet that may cause direct damage to the gut including; inflammatory foods (refined sugar, flour, fried foods) and irritants (alcohol, caffeine or drugs). Other irritants can include chemicals found in processed foods (artificial colours, sweeteners and preservatives) or skincare. Emotional stress can also have a huge impact on your digestive tract which in turn affects both physical and physiological wellbeing. It is important to take time for rest, relaxation and mindfulness to improve gut health and proper digestion.

dreamstime_l_26733793.jpg

Remove the bad

Poor nutrient absorption, a by-product of an imbalance in gut flora can result in a number of health conditions. The first step to resolving these is to remove anything from the diet that may cause direct damage to the gut and include; inflammatory foods (refined sugar, flour, fried foods) and irritants (alcohol, caffeine or prescription drugs). Other irritants can include chemicals found in processed foods (artificial colours, sweeteners and preservatives). Emotional stress can also have a huge impact on your digestive tract which in turn affects both physical and physiological wellbeing. It is important to take time for rest, relaxation and mindfulness to increase gut health and proper digestion.

Replace the good

Add back into your gut the essential ingredients needed for digestion and absorption of nutrients. Sufficient digestive enzymes, hydrochloric acid (stomach acid) and bile production are all compromised over the years by diet, lifestyle, disease and prescription drugs, but they are needed to maintain optimal gut health. Sufficient stomach acid is also needed for proper digestion. If you suffer from low stomach acid, add lemon or a dash of apple cider vinegar (amount will vary on personal taste) to water and drink first thing in the morning and before meals. Aim to consume fluids in between and not during meals, and add more low-starch vegetables into the diet, naturally enzyme rich and high in fibre.

dreamstime_l_44960203.jpg

Restore (Re-inoculate)

Restoring beneficial bacteria to the gut will re-establish a healthy balance and the overall wellbeing of your digestive system. Gut bacteria are collected and formed at birth creating a home to over 500 different types of bacteria however over time the good-to-bad ratio may become unbalanced. Pre and probiotics can be an effective way of rebalancing the good-to-bad bacteria ratio. The prebiotic feeds the probiotic and other good bacteria increasing their effectiveness and helping to restoring optimal gut flora balance and immune health.

Antibiotics are effective in helping to kill bad bacteria when suffering from an infection however it is important to know that antibiotics kill off the good as well as the bad bacteria. So, if you do need to take antibiotics, taking a pre and probiotic will help to restore the good gut flora and bring the ratio of good-to-bad back into balance again.

dreamstime_l_45025580.jpg

Repair

Once the diet is correct, stressors eliminated, and good bacteria restored, the mucosal lining of the gut needs to be repaired. Providing the correct nutrients necessary to help the repair is absolutely essential. L-glutamine is an amino-acid that helps to rejuvenate the gut lining and is the preferred source of fuel for cells in the small intestine. Slippery elm, Aloe Vera, Milk thistle, Omega-3 Fish Oils and Vitamins A, C and E also help to strengthen and repair the gut wall lining.

Your health and wellbeing depends on the digestion and absorption of key nutrients from the diet and is affected by lifestyle choices. Ensure you are making your gut health a priority and see how it can improve not only you digestive health but your overall health and wellbeing too.

Had a gutsful? How to heal your gut.
 
 
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