Naturally healing herbs you can grow at home

Naturally healing herbs you can grow at home

Author -  Good Health

Herbal remedies have been used for centuries to help heal and protect. Some plants have an affinity to specific weaknesses of the body, whereas others have a more generalised effect on our health and wellbeing. Many herbs have also found their way out of the medicine cabinet and into the culinary scene for both their flavouring and fragrance. Herbs have a wonderful ability to help support and heal the body and mind. Here are our top 5 healing herbs that are not only easy to grow but also have many natural health benefits for our bodies.

 

dreamstime_s_95285109.jpg

Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla)

A gentle and soothing herb, Chamomile is suitable for both children and adults. Used to settle upset stomachs, frayed nerves and emotions, chamomile supports a calming night’s sleep for children and a troubled adult mind. Chamomile has mild sedative properties, working as a carminative as well as being anti-spasmodic, antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal. Well known for its healing properties, chamomile is a natural anti-inflammatory that commonly treats a range of childhood complaints including, teething, colic and restlessness. Make a tea from the flower heads and drink to sooth irritability, to aid sleep and relieve stomach pain.

dreamstime_s_95195339.jpg

Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis)

Traditionally used as a sedative, mood enhancer and to stimulate clear thinking, Lemon balm promotes a sense of calm within the body and the mind. A relative of mint, lemon balm is a versatile herb that also helps to relieve gastrointestinal upsets associated with anxiety and nervousness. Infuse the flower and leaves, and drink as a tea for a relaxing, calming effect on the nervous system.

dreamstime_s_76618745.jpg

Thyme (Thymus vulgaris)

Used for centuries throughout Europe as a cooking spice, thyme has tiny aromatic leaves which will complement any medicine cabinet. The main active, thymol, is an essential oil with strong antiseptic properties that can soothe coughs, sore throats and ward of cold and flu’s. Thyme promotes immune support and has strong antimicrobial and astringent activity that helps to fight off infections, including infections of the mouth. Use an infusion of thyme as an antiseptic gargle, drink as tea, or it can be crushed and used as a compress to assist with wounds.

dreamstime_s_73633000.jpg

Sage: Salvia officinalis

Often used in aromatic food dishes, the elongated grey-green sage leaf is extremely easy to grow. Salvia, from the word ‘salvere’ translates as ‘to heal,’ reflective of sage’s traditional medicinal use. Sage is a wonderfully healing herb, treating infections with its antibacterial and antifungal properties and similar to thyme, it is antiseptic. It is through these actions that sage is of great use in the treatment of sore throats, congestion and upper respiratory illness. Also used as a tonic for the brain, studies show sage may be beneficial in increasing the mood and memory of adults, as well as providing a sense of calm. Sage is a key herb in treatment and relief of hot flushes and night sweats as it acts to regulate the body’s temperature control. Gargle for inflamed oral injuries or infections, inhale to relieve respiratory issues or take as an infusion in hot water.

dreamstime_s_57057847.jpg

Peppermint (Mentha x piperita)

Used medicinally for generations as a carminative and digestive aid, this wonderfully well-known herb is an extremely useful antispasmodic. Although peppermint has a wide variety of medicinal uses, it has particular affinity to the digestive system. Peppermint eases stomach troubles including bloating, nausea, morning sickness and diarrhoea. A natural hybrid of spearmint and watermint, the active ingredient menthol has a cooling effect on the skin and works as a topical analgesic. If you suffer from digestive upsets including Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), sipping on infused leaves can help to provide relief to flatulence, pain and discomfort. Peppermint can be inhaled to prevent nausea and vomiting and to promote a sense of calm; a poultice may be applied to skin to relieve itching and burning.

It is wonderful to be able to grow medicine in your own backyard that can support you and your family’s health and wellbeing. Remember to take extra care when choosing your herbs, as some similar species aren’t necessarily medicinal and others are not safe to ingest. As herbs contain powerful medicinal compounds, they should be used cautiously especially as some allergies, medications and health issues may interact. However, when using the right herbs for the right conditions it can hugely benefit our body’s ability to naturally heal and recover.

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Naturally healing herbs you can grow at home

Herbal remedies have been used for centuries to help heal and protect. Some plants have an affinity to specific weaknesses of the body, whereas others have a more generalised effect on our health and wellbeing. Many herbs have also found their way out of the medicine cabinet and into the culinary scene for both their flavouring and fragrance. Herbs have a wonderful ability to help support and heal the body and mind. Here are our top 5 healing herbs that are not only easy to grow but also have many natural health benefits for our bodies.

 

dreamstime_s_95285109.jpg

Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla)

A gentle and soothing herb, Chamomile is suitable for both children and adults. Used to settle upset stomachs, frayed nerves and emotions, chamomile supports a calming night’s sleep for children and a troubled adult mind. Chamomile has mild sedative properties, working as a carminative as well as being anti-spasmodic, antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal. Well known for its healing properties, chamomile is a natural anti-inflammatory that commonly treats a range of childhood complaints including, teething, colic and restlessness. Make a tea from the flower heads and drink to sooth irritability, to aid sleep and relieve stomach pain.

dreamstime_s_95195339.jpg

Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis)

Traditionally used as a sedative, mood enhancer and to stimulate clear thinking, Lemon balm promotes a sense of calm within the body and the mind. A relative of mint, lemon balm is a versatile herb that also helps to relieve gastrointestinal upsets associated with anxiety and nervousness. Infuse the flower and leaves, and drink as a tea for a relaxing, calming effect on the nervous system.

dreamstime_s_76618745.jpg

Thyme (Thymus vulgaris)

Used for centuries throughout Europe as a cooking spice, thyme has tiny aromatic leaves which will complement any medicine cabinet. The main active, thymol, is an essential oil with strong antiseptic properties that can soothe coughs, sore throats and ward of cold and flu’s. Thyme promotes immune support and has strong antimicrobial and astringent activity that helps to fight off infections, including infections of the mouth. Use an infusion of thyme as an antiseptic gargle, drink as tea, or it can be crushed and used as a compress to assist with wounds.

dreamstime_s_73633000.jpg

Sage: Salvia officinalis

Often used in aromatic food dishes, the elongated grey-green sage leaf is extremely easy to grow. Salvia, from the word ‘salvere’ translates as ‘to heal,’ reflective of sage’s traditional medicinal use. Sage is a wonderfully healing herb, treating infections with its antibacterial and antifungal properties and similar to thyme, it is antiseptic. It is through these actions that sage is of great use in the treatment of sore throats, congestion and upper respiratory illness. Also used as a tonic for the brain, studies show sage may be beneficial in increasing the mood and memory of adults, as well as providing a sense of calm. Sage is a key herb in treatment and relief of hot flushes and night sweats as it acts to regulate the body’s temperature control. Gargle for inflamed oral injuries or infections, inhale to relieve respiratory issues or take as an infusion in hot water.

dreamstime_s_57057847.jpg

Peppermint (Mentha x piperita)

Used medicinally for generations as a carminative and digestive aid, this wonderfully well-known herb is an extremely useful antispasmodic. Although peppermint has a wide variety of medicinal uses, it has particular affinity to the digestive system. Peppermint eases stomach troubles including bloating, nausea, morning sickness and diarrhoea. A natural hybrid of spearmint and watermint, the active ingredient menthol has a cooling effect on the skin and works as a topical analgesic. If you suffer from digestive upsets including Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), sipping on infused leaves can help to provide relief to flatulence, pain and discomfort. Peppermint can be inhaled to prevent nausea and vomiting and to promote a sense of calm; a poultice may be applied to skin to relieve itching and burning.

It is wonderful to be able to grow medicine in your own backyard that can support you and your family’s health and wellbeing. Remember to take extra care when choosing your herbs, as some similar species aren’t necessarily medicinal and others are not safe to ingest. As herbs contain powerful medicinal compounds, they should be used cautiously especially as some allergies, medications and health issues may interact. However, when using the right herbs for the right conditions it can hugely benefit our body’s ability to naturally heal and recover.

Naturally healing herbs you can grow at home
 
 
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