Shout out to Magnesium

Shout out to Magnesium

Author -  Good Health

It is estimated that over 300 enzymes are dependent on magnesium for a wide range of biological functions. Essential for optimal health, magnesium is a macro-mineral; that which cannot be made in the body and must be consumed in our diet. The human body contains 25 grams of magnesium; 60% is found in the skeleton, 27% in muscles and the rest on the inside and outside of cells. Tissues with the highest amount of magnesium are
the most metabolically active; the brain, heart, liver and kidneys. Are you consuming enough magnesium to ensure your tissues are functioning optimally? We have everything you need to know about this powerful mineral.

Health benefits

Essential for good health, magnesium is responsible for numerous chemical reactions that keep the body functioning optimally. Known as the muscle mineral, magnesium is often the first port of call for muscle cramps, and rightly so! It is important to note however that magnesium is a relaxing mineral which balances the contracting effect of calcium. Magnesium prevents calcium from moving too quickly in the cell and activating nerves. If your diet provides too little magnesium, too much calcium, or you deplete your magnesium levels; your cells become over excited and this leads to stress, muscle tension and can increase your risk of developing a range of health conditions.

Heart health: Important for proper muscle contractions and energy production; magnesium ensures proper blood pressure regulation, heart rhythm and prevents inflammation in the arteries.

Bone Health: Calcium is usually thought of as the bone mineral however calcium and magnesium function optimally together in a balanced ratio. Chronic magnesium deficiency compromises bone health as it increases inflammation and the brittleness of bones.

Migraines: Migraine suffers are often deficient in magnesium, the mineral having a relaxing effect on the nervous system. Magnesium may alter the threshold for a migraine and so with higher levels, migraines may be less likely to occur.

Premenstrual Symptoms: Zinc, Vitamin B6 and Magnesium are the most deficient nutrients found in sufferers of Premenstrual Syndrome. Magnesium helps to relax the muscles, decreasing menstrual cramps and soothe the nervous system during menstruation.

ISS_7433_00774.jpg

Signs you are not getting enough

It is recommended that Men ingest over 400mg of Magnesium, and Women 310mg of magnesium per day. Recommended dietary intakes are based on avoiding a state of deficiency and so levels of consumption should be higher than recommended to ensure sufficient magnesium for good health. Coffee, alcohol, processed foods, decreased sleep and increased stress, depletes the body of magnesium; and so many of us may need even more magnesium to compensate. Deficiency symptoms include cramps, eye twitching, fatigue, constipation, anxiety and irregular heart rhythms. Many deficiency signs of magnesium are similar to calcium deficiency; however, as our Calcium consumption in New Zealand is high comparatively, deficiency signs usually hint towards a magnesium deficiency. Furthermore, as magnesium may increase the solubility of calcium in the urine, if you are suffering from kidney stone formation, you may want to increase your magnesium intake.

ING_55027_01257.jpg

The best food sources of magnesium

Magnesium deficiency is common during menstruation and so it is no surprise that many of us women crave chocolate, with 100g of dark chocolate providing 120mg of magnesium! Almonds, buckwheat and wheat bran provide well over half your recommended dietary intake per 100g and so making a trail mix full of nuts and seeds is a great way to increase your magnesium intake. Wholegrains are up to 80% higher in magnesium than refined grains, with the magnesium binding to the husk of the grain. High phylate food such as grains, nuts and legumes can hinder the absorption of magnesium as the phylates bind to magnesium and zinc and are carried out of the body. Therefore, green leafy vegetables, namely spinach, silver beet and seaweed are the best sources of magnesium, fermented foods such as sauerkraut further increasing absorption rates.

ING_33594_170547.jpg

Different types of magnesium

Magnesium can come in a range of forms within supplements however the bioavailability of each form differs. Magnesium Chelate, Citrate, Aspartate and Phosphate are all absorbed extremely well. Magnesium Citrate is Magnesium, bound to Citric acid and is water soluble; often the most popular choice as it is less dependent on stomach acid for absorption. Magnesium Hydroxide, Gluconate, Sulfate and Oxide have a laxative effect when taken in high doses and so should be avoided if you have a sensitive stomach.

03B70479.jpg

Other sources of magnesium

Magnesium is rapidly absorbed through the skin and so can be used to sooth aches and pains in a cream or salt form. The skin is the body’s largest organ and direct application allows magnesium to bypass the digestive system; where there may be absorption difficulties or digestive disruptions, a cream will ensure Magnesium has a direct effect on the target area. Using magnesium salts in the form of magnesium chloride has a wonderful relaxing effect on the nervous system, soothing aches and pains. Pour 1-2 cups of Magnesium salts into a bath, add several drops of your favourite essential oil and let Magnesium take care of you.

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Shout out to Magnesium

It is estimated that over 300 enzymes are dependent on magnesium for a wide range of biological functions. Essential for optimal health, magnesium is a macro-mineral; that which cannot be made in the body and must be consumed in our diet. The human body contains 25 grams of magnesium; 60% is found in the skeleton, 27% in muscles and the rest on the inside and outside of cells. Tissues with the highest amount of magnesium are the most metabolically active; the brain, heart, liver and kidneys. Are you consuming enough magnesium to ensure your tissues are functioning optimally? We have everything you need to know about this powerful mineral.

Health benefits

Essential for good health, magnesium is responsible for numerous chemical reactions that keep the body functioning optimally. Known as the muscle mineral, magnesium is often the first port of call for muscle cramps, and rightly so! It is important to note however that magnesium is a relaxing mineral which balances the contracting effect of calcium. Magnesium prevents calcium from moving too quickly in the cell and activating nerves. If your diet provides too little magnesium, too much calcium, or you deplete your magnesium levels; your cells become over excited and this leads to stress, muscle tension and can increase your risk of developing a range of health conditions.

Heart health: Important for proper muscle contractions and energy production; magnesium ensures proper blood pressure regulation, heart rhythm and prevents inflammation in the arteries.

Bone Health: Calcium is usually thought of as the bone mineral however calcium and magnesium function optimally together in a balanced ratio. Chronic magnesium deficiency compromises bone health as it increases inflammation and the brittleness of bones.

Migraines: Migraine suffers are often deficient in magnesium, the mineral having a relaxing effect on the nervous system. Magnesium may alter the threshold for a migraine and so with higher levels, migraines may be less likely to occur.

Premenstrual Symptoms: Zinc, Vitamin B6 and Magnesium are the most deficient nutrients found in sufferers of Premenstrual Syndrome. Magnesium helps to relax the muscles, decreasing menstrual cramps and soothe the nervous system during menstruation.

ISS_7433_00774.jpg

Signs you are not getting enough

It is recommended that Men ingest over 400mg of Magnesium, and Women 310mg of magnesium per day. Recommended dietary intakes are based on avoiding a state of deficiency and so levels of consumption should be higher than recommended to ensure sufficient magnesium for good health. Coffee, alcohol, processed foods, decreased sleep and increased stress, depletes the body of magnesium; and so many of us may need even more magnesium to compensate. Deficiency symptoms include cramps, eye twitching, fatigue, constipation, anxiety and irregular heart rhythms. Many deficiency signs of magnesium are similar to calcium deficiency; however, as our Calcium consumption in New Zealand is high comparatively, deficiency signs usually hint towards a magnesium deficiency. Furthermore, as magnesium may increase the solubility of calcium in the urine, if you are suffering from kidney stone formation, you may want to increase your magnesium intake.

ING_55027_01257.jpg

The best food sources of magnesium

Magnesium deficiency is common during menstruation and so it is no surprise that many of us women crave chocolate, with 100g of dark chocolate providing 120mg of magnesium! Almonds, buckwheat and wheat bran provide well over half your recommended dietary intake per 100g and so making a trail mix full of nuts and seeds is a great way to increase your magnesium intake. Wholegrains are up to 80% higher in magnesium than refined grains, with the magnesium binding to the husk of the grain. High phylate food such as grains, nuts and legumes can hinder the absorption of magnesium as the phylates bind to magnesium and zinc and are carried out of the body. Therefore, green leafy vegetables, namely spinach, silver beet and seaweed are the best sources of magnesium, fermented foods such as sauerkraut further increasing absorption rates.

ING_33594_170547.jpg

Different types of magnesium

Magnesium can come in a range of forms within supplements however the bioavailability of each form differs. Magnesium Chelate, Citrate, Aspartate and Phosphate are all absorbed extremely well. Magnesium Citrate is Magnesium, bound to Citric acid and is water soluble; often the most popular choice as it is less dependent on stomach acid for absorption. Magnesium Hydroxide, Gluconate, Sulfate and Oxide have a laxative effect when taken in high doses and so should be avoided if you have a sensitive stomach.

03B70479.jpg

Other sources of magnesium

Magnesium is rapidly absorbed through the skin and so can be used to sooth aches and pains in a cream or salt form. The skin is the body’s largest organ and direct application allows magnesium to bypass the digestive system; where there may be absorption difficulties or digestive disruptions, a cream will ensure Magnesium has a direct effect on the target area. Using magnesium salts in the form of magnesium chloride has a wonderful relaxing effect on the nervous system, soothing aches and pains. Pour 1-2 cups of Magnesium salts into a bath, add several drops of your favourite essential oil and let Magnesium take care of you.

Shout out to Magnesium
 
 
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