The ‘Sunshine Vitamin’ and its many benefits!

The ‘Sunshine Vitamin’ and its many benefits!

Author -  Good Health

Spring and the longer daylight hours may be just around the corner; however, with reduced sunlight hours during the winter months you could be suffering from a vitamin D deficiency. Some key symptoms can include; achy bones, feeling down – the ‘winter blues’, head sweating and gut trouble.

Best known for its role in supporting bone health and strengthening the immune system, vitamin D is essential for maintaining the mineral balance within the body and has a much wider role to play in our overall health. Read on to discover a few of the less well-known benefits of vitamin D.

More like a Hormone than a Vitamin

Regarded as the ‘Sunshine Vitamin’, upon adequate exposure to UVB radiation from sunlight, between 80-100% of the recommended vitamin D level is produced within the skin, diet alone is often not an adequate source. Both ingested and absorbed forms are converted with the help of the liver and the kidneys into calcitrol (a steroidal hormone). The active form of vitamin D calcitrol predominantly has the typical structure of and acts like other steroidal hormones such as; estrogen, cortisol and aldosterone making it act more like a hormone, than a vitamin.

dreamstime_s_53081851.jpg

Respiratory Support

Low vitamin D levels have been linked to an increased risk of asthma attacks in asthmatics. Research suggests vitamin D may help to support the occurrence of bronchoconstriction and reduce the incidence of upper respiratory tract infections, through vitamin D’s effect on the immune system, helping to manage both the incidence and severity of symptoms.

ISS_4831_01438.jpg

Heart Health

Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Vitamin D is well-known for its ability to stimulate the absorption of calcium; this is believed to be one of the factors that may contribute to the protective effect on the cardiovascular system.

03B73218.jpg

Blood Sugar Support

Vitamin D deficiency is suggested as one of the contributing factors in the development of blood sugar imbalances. Inadequate vitamin D, may affect the release of insulin, reduce insulin-producing cell function and impair glucose metabolism in the body. Healthy insulin release is essential for the regulation of blood sugar levels in the body.

ISS_9875_02261.jpg

Mood and Depression Support

Increasingly research is finding a possible link between vitamin D and its effect on neurotransmitters such as serotonin, which has a large influence on our mood, sleep, stress and overall well-being. Increased vitamin D levels can be effective in helping to manage symptoms of depression, and there is also a suggested link between reduced sunlight exposure during winter and the development of the ‘winter blues’ or Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD).

ING_32193_05725.jpg

Your environment and lifestyle choices can affect your body’s ability to produce vitamin D. As the majority of vitamin D is produced from exposure to adequate sunlight, people who actively avoid the sun by covering their skin, have a dark skin tone, or have limited sun exposure in winter months, can be at greater risk of deficiency.

Increasing outdoor activities and exposing your skin to unprotected sunlight are helpful ways to ensure you are getting enough vitamin D. However, it is important, particularly during summer, to be very careful when exposing our skin to the sun and for only short periods to avoid sunburn. Before 10am and after 4pm are safer, when UV conditions are lower. Supplementing your diet with vitamin D can also be a convenient and easy way to ensure you are consistently getting the required daily dose of vitamin D, especially during those darker winter months.


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The ‘Sunshine Vitamin’ and its many benefits!

Spring and the longer daylight hours may be just around the corner; however, with reduced sunlight hours during the winter months you could be suffering from a vitamin D deficiency. Some key symptoms can include; achy bones, feeling down – the ‘winter blues’, head sweating and gut trouble. Best known for its role in supporting bone health and strengthening the immune system, vitamin D is essential for maintaining the mineral balance within the body and has a much wider role to play in our overall health. Read on to discover a few of the less well-known benefits of vitamin D.

More like a Hormone than a Vitamin

Regarded as the ‘Sunshine Vitamin’, upon adequate exposure to UVB radiation from sunlight, between 80-100% of the recommended vitamin D level is produced within the skin, diet alone is often not an adequate source. Both ingested and absorbed forms are converted with the help of the liver and the kidneys into calcitrol (a steroidal hormone). The active form of vitamin D calcitrol predominantly has the typical structure of and acts like other steroidal hormones such as; estrogen, cortisol and aldosterone making it act more like a hormone, than a vitamin.

dreamstime_s_53081851.jpg

Respiratory Support

Low vitamin D levels have been linked to an increased risk of asthma attacks in asthmatics. Research suggests vitamin D may help to support the occurrence of bronchoconstriction and reduce the incidence of upper respiratory tract infections, through vitamin D’s effect on the immune system, helping to manage both the incidence and severity of symptoms.

ISS_4831_01438.jpg

Heart Health

Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Vitamin D is well-known for its ability to stimulate the absorption of calcium; this is believed to be one of the factors that may contribute to the protective effect on the cardiovascular system.

03B73218.jpg

Blood Sugar Support

Vitamin D deficiency is suggested as one of the contributing factors in the development of blood sugar imbalances. Inadequate vitamin D, may affect the release of insulin, reduce insulin-producing cell function and impair glucose metabolism in the body. Healthy insulin release is essential for the regulation of blood sugar levels in the body.

ISS_9875_02261.jpg

Mood and Depression Support

Increasingly research is finding a possible link between vitamin D and its effect on neurotransmitters such as serotonin, which has a large influence on our mood, sleep, stress and overall well-being. Increased vitamin D levels can be effective in helping to manage symptoms of depression, and there is also a suggested link between reduced sunlight exposure during winter and the development of the ‘winter blues’ or Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD).

ING_32193_05725.jpg

Your environment and lifestyle choices can affect your body’s ability to produce vitamin D. As the majority of vitamin D is produced from exposure to adequate sunlight, people who actively avoid the sun by covering their skin, have a dark skin tone, or have limited sun exposure in winter months, can be at greater risk of deficiency.

Increasing outdoor activities and exposing your skin to unprotected sunlight are helpful ways to ensure you are getting enough vitamin D. However, it is important, particularly during summer, to be very careful when exposing our skin to the sun and for only short periods to avoid sunburn. Before 10am and after 4pm are safer, when UV conditions are lower. Supplementing your diet with vitamin D can also be a convenient and easy way to ensure you are consistently getting the required daily dose of vitamin D, especially during those darker winter months.


The ‘Sunshine Vitamin’ and its many benefits!
 
 
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