Are you okay? Know the signs

Are you okay? Know the signs

Author -  Good Health

Most of us can identify with feeling low or struggling with our mental health at times, but for some it is much more than that. When depression goes on and becomes part of everyday life, it can feel like life is a constant struggle. Whether you suffer from depression or you prefer to describe your feelings in another way, there is no right or wrong way to feel. Depression can be a normal emotion everyone experiences however if you are struggling, it is important to know that you should ask for help. Many people are surrounded by friends or family that are suffering from depression and may be unaware of how these people are feeling. It can be hard to know what signs to look for, especially if you are being told verbally by another that everything is okay. Depression doesn’t look the same for everyone, but there are symptoms that can help to diagnose depression. Be aware of those around you, so that when you see signs or symptoms, you can offer help.

1. Feeling sad or hopeless

Depression is often described as feeling sad, empty, hopeless or ‘down in the dumps’. As people may struggle to admit they are feeling this way, it is important to look at signs that their feelings are not matching verbal cues. It may be that someone is often tearful, have irritable moods, be aggressive, increasingly frustrated, or be suffering from bodily aches and pains. It is common in depression that activities that were once enjoyed, are no longer pleasurable. This dissatisfaction is often seen through facial expressions and can lead to a social withdrawal often described as ‘no longer ‘caring. However, it is important to know that people that often seem happy and bubbly can suffer with depression too.

2. Changes in weight or appetite

Changes in appetite (increased or decreased) is common with depression. People may lose their appetite and feel like they should force themselves to eat; or they may be hungrier than what is normal for them and crave specific foods. Weight loss or gain may also be present, this can be because of, or irrespective to the changes in food consumption.

3.Disturbed sleep or fatigue 

With depression, it is common to see changes in sleeping habits. Some people may suffer with insomnia, finding it difficult to fall asleep, waking during the night, or waking too early and having difficulty getting back to sleep. The other side of the coin is hypersomnia, where there may be prolonged periods of sleep during the night, or increased periods of sleep during the day. With both conditions (or in the absence of either), there is often feelings of fatigue or a loss of energy. Even without physical exertion, small tasks may require a substantial effort and easily cause a feeling of exhaustion or overwhelm.

Are-you-okay-1.jpg

4.Diminished concentration

Depression can cause a slowing down of the body and the mind. There may be a reduction in physical movement; actions and reactions may be slower than normal or there may be a sense of restlessness. People may suffer from an inability to concentrate, have memory difficulties, they may describe an inability to think and be more indecisive than normal.

5.Lack of self-worth

Feeling worthless, being excessively self-critical or suffering from inappropriate guilt about situations that are out of someone’s immediate control is common with depression. People often have a negative thought pattern that is directed at themselves and can take situations or comments to heart. People with depression may put others first and exclude themselves due to feeling like they do not deserve to have something, or that they do not deserve to be happy.

6.Recurrent thoughts of death

Frequently thinking about death is common with depression. Because there is a high mortality rate associated with a major depressive episode, it is important to be aware of the signs and symptoms. There may be clear or subtle suicide related statements. Statements may range from not wanting to get up in the morning or saying that they believe situations would be better without them. With either it is important that you listen, talk to the person about how they are feeling and encourage them to consult a mental health professional.

A clinical diagnosis of depression requires that these signs and symptoms impair a person’s everyday functioning and that they occur more often than not. If you are feeling depressed, or you are unsure if how you are feeling is considered normal, it is important that you do not wait for these symptoms to become worse, talk to someone about how you are feeling. Depression can affect anyone, however if it isn’t discussed then it is not treated, and it can become disabling. The people around you are a good place to start, but if you are unsure what to say, or do not feel safe sharing your feelings, there are many places you can go to for help.


DEPRESSION HELPLINE
Call 0800 111 757 or free text 4202 to talk to a trained counsellor about how you are feeling to ask questions

LIFELINE
Call 0800 5443 354 (0800 LIFELINE) or free text 4357 (HELP)

CRISIS HELPLINE
0508 828 865 (0508 TAUTOKO)

HEALTHLINE
0800611 116


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Are you okay? Know the signs

Most of us can identify with feeling low or struggling with our mental health at times, but for some it is much more than that. When depression goes on and becomes part of everyday life, it can feel like life is a constant struggle. Whether you suffer from depression or you prefer to describe your feelings in another way, there is no right or wrong way to feel. Depression can be a normal emotion everyone experiences however if you are struggling, it is important to know that you should ask for help. Many people are surrounded by friends or family that are suffering from depression and may be unaware of how these people are feeling. It can be hard to know what signs to look for, especially if you are being told verbally by another that everything is okay. Depression doesn’t look the same for everyone, but there are symptoms that can help to diagnose depression. Be aware of those around you, so that when you see signs or symptoms, you can offer help.

1. Feeling sad or hopeless

Depression is often described as feeling sad, empty, hopeless or ‘down in the dumps’. As people may struggle to admit they are feeling this way, it is important to look at signs that their feelings are not matching verbal cues. It may be that someone is often tearful, have irritable moods, be aggressive, increasingly frustrated, or be suffering from bodily aches and pains. It is common in depression that activities that were once enjoyed, are no longer pleasurable. This dissatisfaction is often seen through facial expressions and can lead to a social withdrawal often described as ‘no longer ‘caring. However, it is important to know that people that often seem happy and bubbly can suffer with depression too.

2. Changes in weight or appetite

Changes in appetite (increased or decreased) is common with depression. People may lose their appetite and feel like they should force themselves to eat; or they may be hungrier than what is normal for them and crave specific foods. Weight loss or gain may also be present, this can be because of, or irrespective to the changes in food consumption.

3.Disturbed sleep or fatigue 

With depression, it is common to see changes in sleeping habits. Some people may suffer with insomnia, finding it difficult to fall asleep, waking during the night, or waking too early and having difficulty getting back to sleep. The other side of the coin is hypersomnia, where there may be prolonged periods of sleep during the night, or increased periods of sleep during the day. With both conditions (or in the absence of either), there is often feelings of fatigue or a loss of energy. Even without physical exertion, small tasks may require a substantial effort and easily cause a feeling of exhaustion or overwhelm.

Are-you-okay-1.jpg

4.Diminished concentration

Depression can cause a slowing down of the body and the mind. There may be a reduction in physical movement; actions and reactions may be slower than normal or there may be a sense of restlessness. People may suffer from an inability to concentrate, have memory difficulties, they may describe an inability to think and be more indecisive than normal.

5.Lack of self-worth

Feeling worthless, being excessively self-critical or suffering from inappropriate guilt about situations that are out of someone’s immediate control is common with depression. People often have a negative thought pattern that is directed at themselves and can take situations or comments to heart. People with depression may put others first and exclude themselves due to feeling like they do not deserve to have something, or that they do not deserve to be happy.

6.Recurrent thoughts of death

Frequently thinking about death is common with depression. Because there is a high mortality rate associated with a major depressive episode, it is important to be aware of the signs and symptoms. There may be clear or subtle suicide related statements. Statements may range from not wanting to get up in the morning or saying that they believe situations would be better without them. With either it is important that you listen, talk to the person about how they are feeling and encourage them to consult a mental health professional.

A clinical diagnosis of depression requires that these signs and symptoms impair a person’s everyday functioning and that they occur more often than not. If you are feeling depressed, or you are unsure if how you are feeling is considered normal, it is important that you do not wait for these symptoms to become worse, talk to someone about how you are feeling. Depression can affect anyone, however if it isn’t discussed then it is not treated, and it can become disabling. The people around you are a good place to start, but if you are unsure what to say, or do not feel safe sharing your feelings, there are many places you can go to for help.


DEPRESSION HELPLINE
Call 0800 111 757 or free text 4202 to talk to a trained counsellor about how you are feeling to ask questions

LIFELINE
Call 0800 5443 354 (0800 LIFELINE) or free text 4357 (HELP)

CRISIS HELPLINE
0508 828 865 (0508 TAUTOKO)

HEALTHLINE
0800611 116


Are you okay? Know the signs
 
 
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