Daylight saving time is here! How to transition seamlessly.

Daylight saving time is here! How to transition seamlessly.

Author -  Good Health

Daylight saving time has been on our minds for a while. With the days getting longer and warmer, winter is (almost) a distant memory. No matter how excited you are for summer, daylight saving can have a huge effect on your sleep schedule, especially if you have little ones. Young children have a lower tolerance for sleep deprivation than adults, and the loss of even one hour can affect a child’s attention span, appetite and overall mood. No matter your age, it is not a nice feeling waking up tired, dull, lacklustre and unrefreshed for the day ahead. The good news is, there are many ways you can help bring your body back into balance. Here are our top tips to help your body and mind move seamlessly through the daylight saving challenges, so that you can make the most of it.

01-Blog-img-Daylight-Saving.jpg

1. Get outside

Now the days are getting longer, make the most of the extra sunlight and get outdoors. Whether it is in the morning, the evening, or even your lunch break; sunlight is the best source of vitamin D, a natural mood booster! With children, it is important to create a routine that will help them to get to sleep, especially when the sun is still out! Take them for a bike ride or a walk in the evening; this will enhance their natural vitamin D and boost their mood, so that they will be happier going to bed. 

At least 30 minutes of sun exposure is recommended in New Zealand, this may be later afternoon or early morning when the summer sunshine is less intense. Your exposure time depends on how sensitive your skin is to sunlight. It is thought that 27 percent of people are below recommended blood level of Vitamin D. Health issues such as auto-immunity increase the need for Vitamin D.

02-Blog-img-Daylight-Saving.jpg

2. Control the light

Melatonin is our body’s sleep hormone. It increases as the sun goes down, inducing sleep, and decreases as the sun rises, supporting our alertness. It can be confusing for children, when we ask them to go to bed when the sun is up, and to wake up when it is just rising, especially as their melatonin levels are likely not at optimal levels. To help melatonin increase naturally, ask them to help pull all the curtains around the areas they spend time in before bed, and turn a dim light on in these areas. Ensure that all electronics are off an hour before bed, as the blue light exposure, as well as the brain stimulation, can reduce melatonin. In the morning, ensure children get some natural light, to assist melatonin regulation; have breakfast outside, go for a walk around the block before school or simply ensure curtains are opened, as soon as they wake up.

03-Blog-img-Daylight-Saving.jpg

3. Look to magnesium for extra support

Magnesium nourishes the nervous system and helps the body to relax. As our soil is deficient in magnesium, it is important that we eat a diet high in magnesium-rich foods or supplement the diet. Great food sources of magnesium include almonds, buckwheat, dark chocolate and green leafy vegetables. Ensure your family is having a variety of these foods throughout the day, and especially in the evening, to help induce sleep. Magnesium works to help our parasympathetic nervous system to relax and calm, helping melatonin support healthy sleep/wake cycles in the body.

04-Blog-img-Daylight-Saving.jpg

4. Use herbal remedies

Passionflower, California poppy, Chamomile, Lemon balm and Lavender, are some of the herbs we can use to help induce sleep. Working by relaxing the nervous system, these herbs can be used throughout the day without causing drowsiness; but will help to induce sleep, and help children stay asleep throughout the night. Take as a supplement or use fresh or dried herbs in a tea. Lavender essential oil can be sprayed on pillows or used in a bath to help relax the body and the mind before bed

05-Blog-img-Daylight-Saving.jpg

Daylight savings is an indication of the warmer months to come, however it does not go without a few days of transition. In the first few days, try to be more forgiving as it is likely children will be over tired and frustrated. Understanding that this is temporary will help them to adjust better. The main thing to keep in mind is that a good bedtime routine, ensures that little children get plenty of shut-eye, even if this means they have longer naps during the day. And just as children have a hard time adjusting adults do too, so don’t forget to look after yourself! All these tips can be applied to mum and dad alike, so practice them with your children and help the whole family adjust, seamlessly.

Post New Comment

Daylight saving time is here! How to transition seamlessly.

Daylight saving time has been on our minds for a while. With the days getting longer and warmer, winter is (almost) a distant memory. No matter how excited you are for summer, daylight saving can have a huge effect on your sleep schedule, especially if you have little ones. Young children have a lower tolerance for sleep deprivation than adults, and the loss of even one hour can affect a child’s attention span, appetite and overall mood. No matter your age, it is not a nice feeling waking up tired, dull, lacklustre and unrefreshed for the day ahead. The good news is, there are many ways you can help bring your body back into balance. Here are our top tips to help your body and mind move seamlessly through the daylight saving challenges, so that you can make the most of it.

01-Blog-img-Daylight-Saving.jpg

1. Get outside

Now the days are getting longer, make the most of the extra sunlight and get outdoors. Whether it is in the morning, the evening, or even your lunch break; sunlight is the best source of vitamin D, a natural mood booster! With children, it is important to create a routine that will help them to get to sleep, especially when the sun is still out! Take them for a bike ride or a walk in the evening; this will enhance their natural vitamin D and boost their mood, so that they will be happier going to bed. 

At least 30 minutes of sun exposure is recommended in New Zealand, this may be later afternoon or early morning when the summer sunshine is less intense. Your exposure time depends on how sensitive your skin is to sunlight. It is thought that 27 percent of people are below recommended blood level of Vitamin D. Health issues such as auto-immunity increase the need for Vitamin D.

02-Blog-img-Daylight-Saving.jpg

2. Control the light

Melatonin is our body’s sleep hormone. It increases as the sun goes down, inducing sleep, and decreases as the sun rises, supporting our alertness. It can be confusing for children, when we ask them to go to bed when the sun is up, and to wake up when it is just rising, especially as their melatonin levels are likely not at optimal levels. To help melatonin increase naturally, ask them to help pull all the curtains around the areas they spend time in before bed, and turn a dim light on in these areas. Ensure that all electronics are off an hour before bed, as the blue light exposure, as well as the brain stimulation, can reduce melatonin. In the morning, ensure children get some natural light, to assist melatonin regulation; have breakfast outside, go for a walk around the block before school or simply ensure curtains are opened, as soon as they wake up.

03-Blog-img-Daylight-Saving.jpg

3. Look to magnesium for extra support

Magnesium nourishes the nervous system and helps the body to relax. As our soil is deficient in magnesium, it is important that we eat a diet high in magnesium-rich foods or supplement the diet. Great food sources of magnesium include almonds, buckwheat, dark chocolate and green leafy vegetables. Ensure your family is having a variety of these foods throughout the day, and especially in the evening, to help induce sleep. Magnesium works to help our parasympathetic nervous system to relax and calm, helping melatonin support healthy sleep/wake cycles in the body.

04-Blog-img-Daylight-Saving.jpg

4. Use herbal remedies

Passionflower, California poppy, Chamomile, Lemon balm and Lavender, are some of the herbs we can use to help induce sleep. Working by relaxing the nervous system, these herbs can be used throughout the day without causing drowsiness; but will help to induce sleep, and help children stay asleep throughout the night. Take as a supplement or use fresh or dried herbs in a tea. Lavender essential oil can be sprayed on pillows or used in a bath to help relax the body and the mind before bed

05-Blog-img-Daylight-Saving.jpg

Daylight savings is an indication of the warmer months to come, however it does not go without a few days of transition. In the first few days, try to be more forgiving as it is likely children will be over tired and frustrated. Understanding that this is temporary will help them to adjust better. The main thing to keep in mind is that a good bedtime routine, ensures that little children get plenty of shut-eye, even if this means they have longer naps during the day. And just as children have a hard time adjusting adults do too, so don’t forget to look after yourself! All these tips can be applied to mum and dad alike, so practice them with your children and help the whole family adjust, seamlessly.

Daylight saving time is here! How to transition seamlessly.
 
 
Good Health Club
Receive informative articles, health advice, promotions & more.
Name
General Enquiries
0800 897 969
info@goodhealth.co.nz