How to smoothly transition through daylight saving

How to smoothly transition through daylight saving

Author -  Good Health

As the summer days draw to a close, the hint of coolness in the morning air signals the end of daylight saving. If the thought of winter stresses you out, have comfort that Good Health will have your back to get you through; healthy and happy. Autumn is a great time to really support your immune system for a healthy winter.

Here are our tops tips to smooth the transition into the cooler months, especially when the clocks “fall back” one hour.


 
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1. Change your clocks the night before

Avoid the stress and confusion of what the actual time is by winding your clocks back one hour before you go to bed. Make sure you change your analogue clocks, oven, microwave oven and car clocks. You’ll have a real sense of peace knowing the right time if you take the time to prepare ahead of time.

 

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2. Get up and get going

On the morning of the new time change (thankfully our phones adjust the time automatically!) make sure you get up at your regular time or as you naturally wake. Take advantage of this “extra” morning hour and have a lovely nature walk. A short walk on the beach or stroll through a park can lift your spirit. When the winter mornings become darker and you struggle to get up, a broad-spectrum LED therapy light can be helpful to simulate natural light in the mornings. This can really help your circadian rhythm and the effects of seasonal low mood.

 

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3. Sleep routine

Sticking to the same bedtime and rising time is super helpful for circadian rhythms. When the sun goes down your melatonin rises, and cortisol goes down. When you rise in the morning, your cortisol rises and melatonin goes down, like a seesaw. To enhance the melatonin, it’s important to have a calming night time routine and limit time on screens, as the blue light can disrupt melatonin levels. This goes for the kids too, encourage them to read or have a nice connection time with a bedtime story. Gentle stretches and a calming cup of chamomile tea can also be helpful.

 

Mood-Booster.png

4. Exercise for mood boosters

Utilise those daylight hours when you have them, to fit in your exercise. If you’re feeling a little sluggish due to the change in clocks, don’t ditch the gym or your daily run. You’ll create a natural energy boost by exercising as well as a mood boost.

 

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5. Less sunlight hours means less Vitamin D

Heading into winter means shorter daylight hours which means your Vitamin D naturally declines due to less sun exposure time on your skin. There are some food sources of Vitamin D such as salmon, egg yolk and mushrooms, however, supplementation may be needed to boost levels. Vitamin D is super important for bones, mood and immunity.

 

Magnificent-Magnesium.png

6. Magnificent magnesium
Magnesium is involved in over 300 processes in the body, particularly supporting the nervous system. When stressed, your body uses up magnesium faster, so it’s important to get enough through diet such as almonds, buckwheat, dark chocolate, and green leafy vegetables. In times of high stress, like the fluctuation of seasonal times, it may be important to supplement with magnesium as well. Good Health offers a range of Magnesium and stress products in a variety of delivery methods including delicious chewable tablets for children, sleep creams and easy-to-swallow capsules.

 

 

When transitioning and adjusting to the new daylight saving hours this year, be sure to prioritise something to assist good sleep – a necessity that benefits the whole family.

 

 

 

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How to smoothly transition through daylight saving

As the summer days draw to a close, the hint of coolness in the morning air signals the end of daylight saving. If the thought of winter stresses you out, have comfort that Good Health will have your back to get you through; healthy and happy. Autumn is a great time to really support your immune system for a healthy winter. Here are our tops tips to smooth the transition into the cooler months, especially when the clocks “fall back” one hour.


 
Change-Clocks.png


1. Change your clocks the night before

Avoid the stress and confusion of what the actual time is by winding your clocks back one hour before you go to bed. Make sure you change your analogue clocks, oven, microwave oven and car clocks. You’ll have a real sense of peace knowing the right time if you take the time to prepare ahead of time.

 

Get-Up-And-Go.png

2. Get up and get going

On the morning of the new time change (thankfully our phones adjust the time automatically!) make sure you get up at your regular time or as you naturally wake. Take advantage of this “extra” morning hour and have a lovely nature walk. A short walk on the beach or stroll through a park can lift your spirit. When the winter mornings become darker and you struggle to get up, a broad-spectrum LED therapy light can be helpful to simulate natural light in the mornings. This can really help your circadian rhythm and the effects of seasonal low mood.

 

Sleep-Routine.png

3. Sleep routine

Sticking to the same bedtime and rising time is super helpful for circadian rhythms. When the sun goes down your melatonin rises, and cortisol goes down. When you rise in the morning, your cortisol rises and melatonin goes down, like a seesaw. To enhance the melatonin, it’s important to have a calming night time routine and limit time on screens, as the blue light can disrupt melatonin levels. This goes for the kids too, encourage them to read or have a nice connection time with a bedtime story. Gentle stretches and a calming cup of chamomile tea can also be helpful.

 

Mood-Booster.png

4. Exercise for mood boosters

Utilise those daylight hours when you have them, to fit in your exercise. If you’re feeling a little sluggish due to the change in clocks, don’t ditch the gym or your daily run. You’ll create a natural energy boost by exercising as well as a mood boost.

 

Less-VitD.png

5. Less sunlight hours means less Vitamin D

Heading into winter means shorter daylight hours which means your Vitamin D naturally declines due to less sun exposure time on your skin. There are some food sources of Vitamin D such as salmon, egg yolk and mushrooms, however, supplementation may be needed to boost levels. Vitamin D is super important for bones, mood and immunity.

 

Magnificent-Magnesium.png

6. Magnificent magnesium
Magnesium is involved in over 300 processes in the body, particularly supporting the nervous system. When stressed, your body uses up magnesium faster, so it’s important to get enough through diet such as almonds, buckwheat, dark chocolate, and green leafy vegetables. In times of high stress, like the fluctuation of seasonal times, it may be important to supplement with magnesium as well. Good Health offers a range of Magnesium and stress products in a variety of delivery methods including delicious chewable tablets for children, sleep creams and easy-to-swallow capsules.

 

 

When transitioning and adjusting to the new daylight saving hours this year, be sure to prioritise something to assist good sleep – a necessity that benefits the whole family.

 

 

 

How to smoothly transition through daylight saving
 
 
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