Joint discomfort: Is collagen the answer?

Joint discomfort: Is collagen the answer?

Author -  Good Health

The onset may be subtle. You may be experiencing joint stiffness, reduced flexibility or a niggling pain on motion. This may be occasional at first, however with an increase in age these symptoms often become more frequent, as does the percentage of people experiencing them. Joint inflammation, discomfort and pain, reduced flexibility and mobility are all symptoms of arthritis, an inflammatory condition where there is a wear and tear of cartilage.

You can listen to this article here:

What causes joint pain?

Decades of use lead to degenerative changes that often affect our weight bearing joints such as hands, knees, hips and spine. Before the age of 45, these symptoms are more common in men, however after 45, women take first place. There are several contributors to joint pain, osteoarthritis is commonly caused by aging, stress, injury and the over use of joints whereas in rheumatoid arthritis the body’s own immune system attacks itself causing inflammation. 

Joint-discomfort-1.jpg

Can type II collagen help?

Collagen supplementation has gained popularity for its benefits for our skin, hair, digestive system and joints. However, it is the undenatured type two collagen (UC-II) that is extremely effective in reducing joint pain, discomfort and inflammation. UC-II is processed in low temperature conditions and without chemicals so that it stays in its native state, amplifying its effectiveness. UC-II is a patented form of collagen that has been thoroughly researched by Harvard University for its effectiveness on arthritis.

Why UC-II works so well

Research suggests that UC-II is twice as effective as glucosamine and chondroitin for arthritic conditions, working faster and providing more pain relief. Like turmeric, UC-II also works to reduce inflammation, however it is the unique way this happens which makes UC-II so effective. UC-II deactivates immune T-cells that attack collagen structures, stopping the degrading inflammatory process and allowing the body to rebuild and repair cartilage. Because UC-II works with the immune system to prevent an inflammatory response, it effectively reduces the pain and stiffness associated with both osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, and also helps to regenerate and strengthen cartilage offering a protective effect.

Joint-discomfort-2.jpg

The Sunshine Vitamin

Vitamin D has a crucial role in supporting the production and function of cartilage, stimulating the absorption of calcium and strengthening our bones. Described more as a hormone than a vitamin, vitamin D can be produced by the body however it needs the action of sunlight to do so. In New Zealand, where we slip, slop and slap in the summertime to protect our skin, vitamin D deficiency is common. Research has discovered that those with chronic musculoskeletal pain are commonly deficient in vitamin D and boron, a mineral that is essential for the manufacture of cartilage and maintenance of healthy bones. Vitamin D levels can be supported through supplementation, or spending time outdoors in the early or late hours of the day when the sun is up but the rays are not as harsh.

Nightshades and antioxidants

Evidence suggests that the nightshade family (tomatoes, potatoes, eggplant and capsicum) may trigger joint discomfort and osteoarthritis. Although research is not definitive, it is worth avoiding these foods for a period of time to see if your joint discomfort is relieved. Antioxidants on the other hand are a beneficial addition to the diet. Antioxidants, especially vitamin C (citrus fruit and berries), have been found to reduce the risk of cartilage loss and stop the progression of arthritis as they reduce oxidative damage from free radicals.

Thermotherapy

Applying hot or cold compresses to areas of discomfort is one way you may be able to manage pain. Hot compresses can help to warm the area, increase blood flow and reduce discomfort that may appear when you are feeling stiff. Applying cold compresses can help to reduce swelling and inflammation, numb the painful area and block nerve impulses that cause muscle spasms. It is important to find which one is most effective for you.

Joint-discomfort-3.jpg

The importance of keeping active

Joint pain is often increased during prolonged activity however eliminating exercise won’t help the problem. This is because decreased physical activity is a risk factor for developing or worsening the condition. Light to moderate exercise can help to improve muscle strength, support flexibility and range of motion, reduce obesity and assist our general wellbeing. As it is the weight bearing joints where joint pain and inflammation commonly occurs, it is important to maintain a healthy weight. Finding a low impact exercise that you enjoy such as walking, swimming, yoga or tai chi helps to improve blood flow, support the joints and reduce the pain and inflammation associated with arthritis.

As we age our ability to repair cartilage decreases, however with the right supplemental, nutritional and lifestyle support, joint discomfort does not need to be permanent. When the body ages, it needs extra support but even before we have symptoms of joint discomfort, we should be protecting the function of our joints. Our joints receive nutrients through the adjoining bones, so it is important to support the body with the right nutrients as healthy bones make for healthy, well-functioning joints. Providing your body with the right support can lead to a happy, healthier body, and improved mental and emotional wellbeing.

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Joint discomfort: Is collagen the answer?

The onset may be subtle. You may be experiencing joint stiffness, reduced flexibility or a niggling pain on motion. This may be occasional at first, however with an increase in age these symptoms often become more frequent, as does the percentage of people experiencing them. Joint inflammation, discomfort and pain, reduced flexibility and mobility are all symptoms of arthritis, an inflammatory condition where there is a wear and tear of cartilage.
You can listen to this article here:

What causes joint pain?

Decades of use lead to degenerative changes that often affect our weight bearing joints such as hands, knees, hips and spine. Before the age of 45, these symptoms are more common in men, however after 45, women take first place. There are several contributors to joint pain, osteoarthritis is commonly caused by aging, stress, injury and the over use of joints whereas in rheumatoid arthritis the body’s own immune system attacks itself causing inflammation. 

Joint-discomfort-1.jpg

Can type II collagen help?

Collagen supplementation has gained popularity for its benefits for our skin, hair, digestive system and joints. However, it is the undenatured type two collagen (UC-II) that is extremely effective in reducing joint pain, discomfort and inflammation. UC-II is processed in low temperature conditions and without chemicals so that it stays in its native state, amplifying its effectiveness. UC-II is a patented form of collagen that has been thoroughly researched by Harvard University for its effectiveness on arthritis.

Why UC-II works so well

Research suggests that UC-II is twice as effective as glucosamine and chondroitin for arthritic conditions, working faster and providing more pain relief. Like turmeric, UC-II also works to reduce inflammation, however it is the unique way this happens which makes UC-II so effective. UC-II deactivates immune T-cells that attack collagen structures, stopping the degrading inflammatory process and allowing the body to rebuild and repair cartilage. Because UC-II works with the immune system to prevent an inflammatory response, it effectively reduces the pain and stiffness associated with both osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, and also helps to regenerate and strengthen cartilage offering a protective effect.

Joint-discomfort-2.jpg

The Sunshine Vitamin

Vitamin D has a crucial role in supporting the production and function of cartilage, stimulating the absorption of calcium and strengthening our bones. Described more as a hormone than a vitamin, vitamin D can be produced by the body however it needs the action of sunlight to do so. In New Zealand, where we slip, slop and slap in the summertime to protect our skin, vitamin D deficiency is common. Research has discovered that those with chronic musculoskeletal pain are commonly deficient in vitamin D and boron, a mineral that is essential for the manufacture of cartilage and maintenance of healthy bones. Vitamin D levels can be supported through supplementation, or spending time outdoors in the early or late hours of the day when the sun is up but the rays are not as harsh.

Nightshades and antioxidants

Evidence suggests that the nightshade family (tomatoes, potatoes, eggplant and capsicum) may trigger joint discomfort and osteoarthritis. Although research is not definitive, it is worth avoiding these foods for a period of time to see if your joint discomfort is relieved. Antioxidants on the other hand are a beneficial addition to the diet. Antioxidants, especially vitamin C (citrus fruit and berries), have been found to reduce the risk of cartilage loss and stop the progression of arthritis as they reduce oxidative damage from free radicals.

Thermotherapy

Applying hot or cold compresses to areas of discomfort is one way you may be able to manage pain. Hot compresses can help to warm the area, increase blood flow and reduce discomfort that may appear when you are feeling stiff. Applying cold compresses can help to reduce swelling and inflammation, numb the painful area and block nerve impulses that cause muscle spasms. It is important to find which one is most effective for you.

Joint-discomfort-3.jpg

The importance of keeping active

Joint pain is often increased during prolonged activity however eliminating exercise won’t help the problem. This is because decreased physical activity is a risk factor for developing or worsening the condition. Light to moderate exercise can help to improve muscle strength, support flexibility and range of motion, reduce obesity and assist our general wellbeing. As it is the weight bearing joints where joint pain and inflammation commonly occurs, it is important to maintain a healthy weight. Finding a low impact exercise that you enjoy such as walking, swimming, yoga or tai chi helps to improve blood flow, support the joints and reduce the pain and inflammation associated with arthritis.

As we age our ability to repair cartilage decreases, however with the right supplemental, nutritional and lifestyle support, joint discomfort does not need to be permanent. When the body ages, it needs extra support but even before we have symptoms of joint discomfort, we should be protecting the function of our joints. Our joints receive nutrients through the adjoining bones, so it is important to support the body with the right nutrients as healthy bones make for healthy, well-functioning joints. Providing your body with the right support can lead to a happy, healthier body, and improved mental and emotional wellbeing.

Joint discomfort: Is collagen the answer?
 
 
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