The Importance of Lysine

The Importance of Lysine

Author -  Good Health

Lysine is an essential amino acid and a building block for protein. Because our bodies cannot manufacture lysine, we need to consume it either from food or through supplementation. Lysine is associated with many different bodily functions.

Herpes Cold Sores

The herpes simplex virus causes cold sores, which are fluid-filled blisters that develop on and around the lips and sometimes the tongue. The amino acid arginine encourages the flare-up of the herpes simplex virus, leading to breakouts. Lysine can combat this effect of arginine. Applying an ointment containing lysine to the lips when cold sore symptoms first appear, can help minimise the blister. Furthermore, supplementing the diet with lysine may keep the balance between these two amino acids in check, reducing the occurrence of cold sores. Sources of foods that are high in lysine and low in arginine are fish, meats, and dairy.

lip-cream.png


Collagen Production

Collagen is responsible for building cartilage, bones, and connective tissue. Lysine helps in the formation of cartilage and collagen. Calcium and collagen work together to prevent bone loss. In a diet low in lysine, the formation of calcium and collagen slows. This is one reason why many people with lysine deficiencies have fragile bones.

Collagen-spoon.png

 

Stress

Some studies suggest that lysine may help treat stress and related disorders. Based on research studies, it appears that lysine works by lowering the stress hormone cortisol and can be used either alone or in combination with the amino acid arginine. Lysine also shows potential to improve digestive problems triggered by stress, such as diarrhoea associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

Stress.png

 

Blood Sugar

Some studies have indicated that lysine can lower fasting blood glucose levels and reduce inflammation of the pancreas, both of which help people with diabetes, manage blood sugar levels. Controlling blood sugar to avoid peaks and dips, allows for better management of this disease.

Blood-Sugar.png

 

Cardiovascular Function

Lysine may influence the levels of LDL (low density) cholesterol in the bloodstream. LDL cholesterol accumulates around the arteries, leading to hardened artery walls and reduced blood flow. A diet rich in lysine inhibits the build-up of LDL cholesterol and keeps the cardiovascular system working as it should. Plaque build-up in the arteries can increase the risk of heart disease, stroke, and erectile dysfunction. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory properties of lysine may reduce high blood pressure and help manage hypertension.

Cardio.png

 

Bone Density

Calcium helps build strong bones, but a healthy amount of lysine can improve absorption and reduce the amount of calcium excreted during digestion, helping bones use calcium and other minerals more efficiently. This is particularly important for older women who are at risk of osteoporosis.

older-lady.png



Adding Lysine to Diet

Many foods are particularly high in lysine like lean beef, fish, lamb, turkey, and chicken. Vegetarians may struggle to acquire lysine in their diets however parmesan cheese, white beans, and eggs can be good options. Tofu, roasted soybeans, and pumpkins seeds also contain good levels of lysine. 

soy-beans2.png


As we can see, lysine plays an important role in our overall health and wellbeing. It is important to provide our body with the support it needs by correcting any nutrient deficiencies so that we can enjoy the benefit of good health. 

 

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The Importance of Lysine

Lysine is an essential amino acid and a building block for protein. Because our bodies cannot manufacture lysine, we need to consume it either from food or through supplementation. Lysine is associated with many different bodily functions.

Herpes Cold Sores

The herpes simplex virus causes cold sores, which are fluid-filled blisters that develop on and around the lips and sometimes the tongue. The amino acid arginine encourages the flare-up of the herpes simplex virus, leading to breakouts. Lysine can combat this effect of arginine. Applying an ointment containing lysine to the lips when cold sore symptoms first appear, can help minimise the blister. Furthermore, supplementing the diet with lysine may keep the balance between these two amino acids in check, reducing the occurrence of cold sores. Sources of foods that are high in lysine and low in arginine are fish, meats, and dairy.

lip-cream.png


Collagen Production

Collagen is responsible for building cartilage, bones, and connective tissue. Lysine helps in the formation of cartilage and collagen. Calcium and collagen work together to prevent bone loss. In a diet low in lysine, the formation of calcium and collagen slows. This is one reason why many people with lysine deficiencies have fragile bones.

Collagen-spoon.png

 

Stress

Some studies suggest that lysine may help treat stress and related disorders. Based on research studies, it appears that lysine works by lowering the stress hormone cortisol and can be used either alone or in combination with the amino acid arginine. Lysine also shows potential to improve digestive problems triggered by stress, such as diarrhoea associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

Stress.png

 

Blood Sugar

Some studies have indicated that lysine can lower fasting blood glucose levels and reduce inflammation of the pancreas, both of which help people with diabetes, manage blood sugar levels. Controlling blood sugar to avoid peaks and dips, allows for better management of this disease.

Blood-Sugar.png

 

Cardiovascular Function

Lysine may influence the levels of LDL (low density) cholesterol in the bloodstream. LDL cholesterol accumulates around the arteries, leading to hardened artery walls and reduced blood flow. A diet rich in lysine inhibits the build-up of LDL cholesterol and keeps the cardiovascular system working as it should. Plaque build-up in the arteries can increase the risk of heart disease, stroke, and erectile dysfunction. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory properties of lysine may reduce high blood pressure and help manage hypertension.

Cardio.png

 

Bone Density

Calcium helps build strong bones, but a healthy amount of lysine can improve absorption and reduce the amount of calcium excreted during digestion, helping bones use calcium and other minerals more efficiently. This is particularly important for older women who are at risk of osteoporosis.

older-lady.png



Adding Lysine to Diet

Many foods are particularly high in lysine like lean beef, fish, lamb, turkey, and chicken. Vegetarians may struggle to acquire lysine in their diets however parmesan cheese, white beans, and eggs can be good options. Tofu, roasted soybeans, and pumpkins seeds also contain good levels of lysine. 

soy-beans2.png


As we can see, lysine plays an important role in our overall health and wellbeing. It is important to provide our body with the support it needs by correcting any nutrient deficiencies so that we can enjoy the benefit of good health. 

 

The Importance of Lysine
 
 
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