The new natural pain relief ingredient to support your comfort

The new natural pain relief ingredient to support your comfort

Author -  Good Health

Our reasons for physical discomfort vary, sometimes it’s because of nerve or muscle pain and sometimes its digestive discomfort or feeling achy from a viral illness; everyone is different. However, the way we experience that discomfort and how it affects our lives can be similar.

Does that pain stop you doing the things you enjoy? Does it stop you going out to see the people you love? Pain affects our lives in many ways so it’s good to know that nature has given us options to support our comfort.

One in six New Zealanders reportedly live with chronic pain1 and nearly half of those struggling have used some form of medical treatment to help. But what if that treatment gave you terrible side effects or had the potential to become addictive? There are many people searching for a more natural solution for pain relief.

New to the New Zealand market is the ingredient Palmitoylethanolamide; the powerful natural pain relief with a very long name, but also known more simply, as PEA.


 
PEA.png

What is PEA?

Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is a naturally occurring compound that our bodies make, but it’s also found in some foods such as soy, egg yolk, milk, breast milk, tomatoes, and avocado. It’s a fatty acid amide or sometimes referred to as “pro-resolving lipid signalling molecule.2 What this means is that PEA can have an effect within cells on the communication or signalling to reduce inflammation and cellular stress.

 

Puppy-Love.png

How does PEA work in the body?

This compound has been studied extensively for many years; for 7 decades in fact! There have been over 350 research papers on PEA, documenting its wide range of therapeutic effects, such as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, neuroprotective, anti-influenza, anti-allergic and modulation of immune response in both animal and human studies. It also has an excellent safety profile.

Because PEA works on several physiological pathways including the endocannabinoid system, transcription factors and modulation of mast cells it has use as a broad-spectrum pain reliever3.  

Mast cells are key performers in the inflammatory response as they can be activated to release a wide variety of inflammatory mediators. Many different things can set off mast cells; anything from physical injury to pollens or other allergens to bacteria and viruses. Therefore, they can trigger the pain cascade of congestion of the sinuses, back and nerve pain, pain and inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis, endometriosis and digestive discomfort. PEA helps to modulate the mast cell activation, disrupting the cascade and therefore reducing the pain.

 

Low-Immunity.png

How does it help the immune system?

As well as the mast cell modulation described above, PEA down modulates a number of pro-inflammatory cytokines, this could very well be the reason for the decreased influenza and common cold symptomatology in individuals treated with PEA.
There have been many clinical trials that show PEA has clear treatment effects in respiratory infections, can be used as influenza-prophylaxis, and is safe in its use4.

 

Sore-Back.png

What kind of pain can PEA help?

PEA has been studied for a variety of pain situation5:
Joint pain
Low back pain / sciatica
Nerve pain
Osteoarthritis
TMJ osteoarthritis
Diabetic neuropathy
Dental pain
Fibromyalgia

In fact, in one study PEA was compared to ibuprofen when treating temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis; after two weeks of treatment, the participants were evaluated, and the pain decrease was significantly greater with PEA than with ibuprofen6. PEA has both anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties to really assist your comfort levels.

 

Bad-Digestion.png

What about digestive discomfort?

Inflammation can lead to intestinal permeability which can then lead to pain and discomfort. PEA’s anti-inflammatory action has been shown to reduce this inflammation and reduce the intestinal permeability7. When there is less intestinal permeability or leaky gut there is less chance of food intolerances, autoimmune conditions as well as pain and digestive discomfort. So, when your stomach and ibuprofen or NSAID’s just don’t get along anymore but you need something to ease your discomfort, then PEA is a great option. 

It’s time to get back out there doing the things you love and seeing the people you love. Look for the ingredient PEA to improve your comfort levels as it is a safe and effective natural option for broad spectrum pain relief.

 

[1] https://www.healthnavigator.org.nz/health-a-z/c/chronic-pain/
[2] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4263681/
[3] https://www.hindawi.com/journals/iji/2013/151028/
[4]  https://www.hindawi.com/journals/iji/2013/151028/
[5] https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28727699/
[6]  https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22558609/
[7]  https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31054246/



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The new natural pain relief ingredient to support your comfort

Our reasons for physical discomfort vary, sometimes it’s because of nerve or muscle pain and sometimes its digestive discomfort or feeling achy from a viral illness; everyone is different. However, the way we experience that discomfort and how it affects our lives can be similar. Does that pain stop you doing the things you enjoy? Does it stop you going out to see the people you love? Pain affects our lives in many ways so it’s good to know that nature has given us options to support our comfort.

One in six New Zealanders reportedly live with chronic pain1 and nearly half of those struggling have used some form of medical treatment to help. But what if that treatment gave you terrible side effects or had the potential to become addictive? There are many people searching for a more natural solution for pain relief.

New to the New Zealand market is the ingredient Palmitoylethanolamide; the powerful natural pain relief with a very long name, but also known more simply, as PEA.


 
PEA.png

What is PEA?

Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is a naturally occurring compound that our bodies make, but it’s also found in some foods such as soy, egg yolk, milk, breast milk, tomatoes, and avocado. It’s a fatty acid amide or sometimes referred to as “pro-resolving lipid signalling molecule.2 What this means is that PEA can have an effect within cells on the communication or signalling to reduce inflammation and cellular stress.

 

Puppy-Love.png

How does PEA work in the body?

This compound has been studied extensively for many years; for 7 decades in fact! There have been over 350 research papers on PEA, documenting its wide range of therapeutic effects, such as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, neuroprotective, anti-influenza, anti-allergic and modulation of immune response in both animal and human studies. It also has an excellent safety profile.

Because PEA works on several physiological pathways including the endocannabinoid system, transcription factors and modulation of mast cells it has use as a broad-spectrum pain reliever3.  

Mast cells are key performers in the inflammatory response as they can be activated to release a wide variety of inflammatory mediators. Many different things can set off mast cells; anything from physical injury to pollens or other allergens to bacteria and viruses. Therefore, they can trigger the pain cascade of congestion of the sinuses, back and nerve pain, pain and inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis, endometriosis and digestive discomfort. PEA helps to modulate the mast cell activation, disrupting the cascade and therefore reducing the pain.

 

Low-Immunity.png

How does it help the immune system?

As well as the mast cell modulation described above, PEA down modulates a number of pro-inflammatory cytokines, this could very well be the reason for the decreased influenza and common cold symptomatology in individuals treated with PEA.
There have been many clinical trials that show PEA has clear treatment effects in respiratory infections, can be used as influenza-prophylaxis, and is safe in its use4.

 

Sore-Back.png

What kind of pain can PEA help?

PEA has been studied for a variety of pain situation5:
Joint pain
Low back pain / sciatica
Nerve pain
Osteoarthritis
TMJ osteoarthritis
Diabetic neuropathy
Dental pain
Fibromyalgia

In fact, in one study PEA was compared to ibuprofen when treating temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis; after two weeks of treatment, the participants were evaluated, and the pain decrease was significantly greater with PEA than with ibuprofen6. PEA has both anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties to really assist your comfort levels.

 

Bad-Digestion.png

What about digestive discomfort?

Inflammation can lead to intestinal permeability which can then lead to pain and discomfort. PEA’s anti-inflammatory action has been shown to reduce this inflammation and reduce the intestinal permeability7. When there is less intestinal permeability or leaky gut there is less chance of food intolerances, autoimmune conditions as well as pain and digestive discomfort. So, when your stomach and ibuprofen or NSAID’s just don’t get along anymore but you need something to ease your discomfort, then PEA is a great option. 

It’s time to get back out there doing the things you love and seeing the people you love. Look for the ingredient PEA to improve your comfort levels as it is a safe and effective natural option for broad spectrum pain relief.

 

[1] https://www.healthnavigator.org.nz/health-a-z/c/chronic-pain/
[2] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4263681/
[3] https://www.hindawi.com/journals/iji/2013/151028/
[4]  https://www.hindawi.com/journals/iji/2013/151028/
[5] https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28727699/
[6]  https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22558609/
[7]  https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31054246/



The new natural pain relief ingredient to support your comfort
 
 
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